The Monday Mission Project, Part 4: Danny

This will be the final feature in The Monday Mission Project before I wrap the series up tomorrow. Catch up on the first three posts back on my home page and read about why I’m doing this here. As I was thinking about this idea originally, I wanted to be sure and include a variety of perspectives from different types of professions to show just how creative our God is when he gives us each unique gifts and passions, so today I’ll be featuring my friend Danny for a business point of view. Danny is also a senior at Baylor and is headed to Boston (#EastCoastBestCoast) after graduation to work as a management consulting analyst for the company Accenture. I’m not kidding when I say he is a Business Fellows, Economics, and Finance triple major with minors in Math and Political Science. He is one of those people that just seems to do it all and do it all well. Even still, I’ve never heard him complain about his workload. His humility is a testament that he doesn’t do it for the glory, either. I’ve known him since freshman year, and I’ve always been extremely impressed by how he is able to balance everything on his plate. Danny is the definition of diligence and really does point others to Jesus through the way he works unto the Lord and how he leads and serves others so well. He is an encourager to the core, too. Any time you leave a conversation with him, you’ll always find a refreshed perspective and motivation. One last thing about him (and why I think we get each other so well) is that he is an unbelievable dreamer and full of ambition. I believe God has marked his life to be a vessel for the Spirit and to ignite change where there are desperate needs for it. Danny has (and will always have) such a place of influence in so many different areas of his life, and I’m beyond excited to watch how God uses him and continues to lead him.

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1. Describe the process of ultimately choosing to pursue business for your career. How did God lead you into this profession along the way and when did you know you were really walking in his calling on your life?

Ultimately, I chose to begin my career in management consulting (business) because I think my God-given talents apply very well to this area. I’m a problem-solver, and I love going into new situations and finding out how to make things better. The business world runs by “mutual benefit.” Companies are only successful if they produce useful products or services that customers want. For a time, I thought I really wanted to go into politics – perhaps because of this same desire to “solve problems” on a societal level. Over time, however, God showed me that beginning in the private sector would be a much better way to build an expertise and learn how to make sure organizations are able to reach their highest potential.

2. How do you hope to practically show the love of Jesus through your work and be a light to the people you interact with everyday? How do you see yourself serving God and others through your profession on a day-to-day basis?

My dad is always an optimist, and so that carries through in everything I do. I think a key to success is not complaining about the little things. The people around us, whether in business, graduate school, or whatever career you’re in, will make mistakes and have hard days too. It’s important to show the love of Jesus through your work by maintaining a positive outlook and encouraging those around you. Make their lives easier. Thank them for their dedication. As a result, you’ll be more productive and show how Christ has changed your outlook on life.

3. What opportunities, big or small, do you hope to have to partner with God and make an impact for his kingdom that you wouldn’t have otherwise if you weren’t doing what you are?

I think this position in management consulting will teach me many valuable skills that can translate to all aspects of life. Whether a business, non-profit, university, or political campaign, there are always problems that need to be solved. There are things that are going to go wrong, and the world will need people to take a fresh look at each situation and find ways to improve. I believe this job will prepare me to do that, and I hope to use those skills in whatever way I can to glorify God.

4. What are you looking forward to most about your career and the next season of life?

Honestly, I’m looking forward to a new adventure in Boston! I grew up in Chicago. When I came to Baylor, it was my first time in Texas and I didn’t know anybody. Then, I spent each summer in DC – where I didn’t know anybody. Now, after building those connections, it feels like I have “3 homes” – and I’m excited to jump into a new city and build a 4th.

5. How do you think you’ll stay enthusiastic/passionate and find the motivation to continue to work diligently for his glory?

I think the most important factor is to be grounded in the right habits. I plan to find another church where I can dive in and get involved, continue reading the Bible every day, and ultimately trusting God to show me the next steps. I have to constantly remind myself that everything I do on this Earth will pass away.

6. What would you say to others entering corporate business or politics about incorporating your faith in a career where it might be challenged more than in other fields?

Business and politics are often described as immoral. But that’s exactly why we need more Christians in those fields! After my time in DC, I met so many powerful people who were committed to their faith. It influenced their interactions with people so much so that people knew them as trustworthy, honest, and yet still incredibly influential. God works through all things. Most Americans spend the majority of their week in a workplace not directly related to Christianity, so it’s important to bring a Christ-like attitude to those places as well.

7. What advice would you give to college freshman on discovering and pursuing what God has for them in terms of their major, future career, etc?

Don’t worry. For almost all of my college experience, I was sure I was going to DC. But at the last minute, I really started to reconsider – and here I am, taking a different path, but one that I am more excited about. Don’t put God in a box, and recognize that our “plans” can change faster than you realize. Work hard, get involved in things outside of class, but also just have fun. Don’t spend your entire college life stressing about the things that you can’t control – you’ll simply be wasting your time.

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Thanks so much for your thoughts, Danny! Also, this guy has his own blog at Consider Again (and is a contributor for endless others and has had the chance to write for some pretty cool projects). To quote his description of his site, “Consider Again is a blog by Danny Huizinga devoted to encouraging critical thinking. It features an archive of all of my published articles, both profiles on successful entrepreneurs and small businesses and op-eds on current events. Rather than taking articles and opinions at face value, I challenge you to think a little deeper. Being able to know why you agree or disagree with an opinion is one of the most important life skills.” He writes about current issues in politics, business, and a variety of other topics. Check it out!

Oh and be on the lookout for him to run for president one day. And win.

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The Monday Mission Project, Part 3: Dr. Jason Beck

So far I’ve really enjoyed this interview series and getting to hear additional insight from so many of the incredible people I know about how they serve God through their career, day in and day out. Today’s post in The Monday Mission Project (if you’re just joining us check out the intro here) is featuring Dr. Jason Beck, DDS, MD, and it is an especially relevant one to include since he’s my main professional mentor in the world of dentistry (and fellow doctor colleague in about four to ten years). What he does every day is basically what I want to do one day! First things first: four years of dental school. Then if I’m crazy enough (let’s face it, we all know I am) and do decide down the road to specialize I’m looking at another four to six years of postdoc training. I am going in with an open mind regarding specializing or not, but I’d be lying if I said I didn’t love surgery or couldn’t see myself doing this everyday. He is a practicing oral and maxillofacial surgeon here in Waco, and I first met him two summers ago when I was getting some more shadowing hours in with another general dentist in town. I had actually called his office asking the receptionist if I could come observe with no real guaranteed set up before I ran into him having lunch with the dentists I was originally shadowing. He told me to immediately call back and say that he personally had met me and would love for me to come observe at his office for a few days. Needless to say those few days turned into once or twice every week and then eventually the same thing for the entire next summer. I have written a couple times on my experiences working with him (click here or here to read about it), but long story short, he’s great and I have so much respect for him. I consider him, his wife, and his three adorable boys basically my Waco family. He’s not only an exceptional and compassionate doctor, Dr. Beck is a successful and humble business owner, a godly leader for his family and staff, and a sincere voice of wisdom in my life. I can ask him anything about dental school, residency, running a practice, etc, and know he’s going to give me a genuinely honest answer and not sugar coat anything. He also is constantly encouraging me to lean not on my own understanding but to trust in the Lord with his plan for my life. He understands my big dreams and affirms I really do have what it takes. Seeing how Dr. Beck has surrendered his career to God and how in turn God has been faithful to keep his promises, I can only become more excited to see how my career as a dentist will be used for God’s glory.

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1. Describe the process of ultimately choosing to pursue dentistry and oral surgery for your career. How did God lead you into this profession along the way and when did you know you were really walking in his calling on your life?

As a child, I have always felt like I would have a job that would be highly respected and financially lucrative as well. I didn’t know what that would be, however, this had propelled me to excel in everything along the way to eventually make this a reality. Into college, I had always enjoyed the sciences more than anything else. I think because there was always a tangible product that came from scientific work and it is the scientists who I always admired more so than the great thinkers and writers. Scientists were doers and they made things happen. Eventually, I explored the health sciences from physical therapy, to medicine, and ultimately dentistry. Dentistry was particularly appealing to me because it was very hands on work that works well for us ADD individuals. I also felt that the verse in 1 Thess 4:11 was speaking to me about my career choice. “Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to work with your hands as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anyone.” Dentistry appeared rewarding, fun, and to provide an independence that other careers could not offer. In dental school, I had an even stronger desire to attain all these things in the greatest amount and oral surgery seemed to be the next great challenge for me. I knew that it was where I was supposed to be, because logic would say that general dentistry can provide everything I could possibly want. Nevertheless, there was a thrill I found in doing surgery, that’s it. God speaks to me in many ways, but at this point he simply wanted me to “enjoy life, and have it abundantly.”

2. How do you practically show the love of Jesus through your work and be a light to the people you interact with everyday? How do you see yourself serving God and others through your profession on a day-to-day basis?

I have had people tell me, “I know you’re a believer because I see Jesus in you.” There is no better complement. Providing a calmness before surgery and reflecting the Love of Jesus to a phobic patient has a profound effect on a person in a vulnerable state. I have prayed with patients, quoted scripture to them, and simply cared and showed compassion for them because that is what Jesus taught us as his children. As a business owner, though, I could be that for my patients and viewed as a hypocrite to my staff if I am not consistent. I see my staff as my ministry as much as my patients. They don’t know it, but they are prayed for all the time and I hope that when non-believing employees see something admirable in me, it will point them to Him.

3. What opportunities, big or small, has your career given you to partner with God and make an impact for his kingdom that you wouldn’t have had otherwise if you weren’t doing what you are.

Similar as the previous question. Patients are in a vulnerable, fearful state when undergoing a surgery, so they are looking for someone to put their trust in and lead them through this stressful situation. When things go well for them and they try to show gratitude, I can point to Jesus. My kids pray for my patients every night, so I can tell them that, which makes an impact on their kingdom experience. Additionally, on more global scale, I have been able to provide care to those in third world countries whose only encounter with a physician in life is the one who came delivering the good news of Jesus while tending to their physical needs. This could impact their beliefs for not only their life but generations of isolated families after them.

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4.Describe how your specific gifts and talents God’s given you correlate with your profession.

I have always been a confident person who can make decisions quickly and actually become energized during periods of elevated stress. These have proven to be advantageous to me during an arduous training period and continued profession with “high stress” that comes from putting a patient’s health and well-being in your hands.

5. What do you love most about your job?

I love being able to heal, whether from an ailment, a pathology, or a phobia. To have a patient walk out of the office with exceeded expectations.

6. How do you stay enthusiastic/passionate and find the motivation to continue to work diligently for his glory?

I count my blessings everyday. When I do, I am reminded that all I have comes from him anyway and therefore, not squander my talents that my Master gave to me. (Matt 25:14)

7.What advice would you give to college students who are wondering how they can serve God and be the hands and feet of Jesus through their careers even if it’s not directly in ministry, missions, the church, etc.?

God doesn’t call you to do what you are “good” at or what you love. He calls you to simply obey whatever it is and wherever it is that he has planned for you at the time. I do believe that he gives you certain desires in your heart and truly wants you to have everything your heart desires. But if you seek him in the little decisions along the way, you will have a deeper trust in Him for your future and true contentment will follow.IMG_2788

Another big thanks to Jason, and the next post will be the fourth and final feature!

Shameless plug – Any friends in Waco that need your wisdom teeth out or dental implants? Look no further than this guy. Plus, I might even be there to hear what you have to say post-anesthesia 🙂

The Monday Mission Project, Part 2: Chelsea

Tonight for part two of The Monday Mission Project (click here to read the series intro and background), I’m featuring someone very near and dear to my heart – one of my own roommates for the past two years, Chelsea! Living with Chelsea is nothing short of a blast. We are on the same page when it comes to so many things like our love of food, traveling the world, music and concerts, all things Shauna Niequist, big crazy dreams, and late night popcorn and red wine when we are in denial of all of the homework we should be doing. Chelsea has also taught me a lot about what it looks like to chase after God and the things He has for us. I am constantly encouraged by her heart for others, her passion for life, and the incredible diligence she pours into her work for school. She is majoring in Interior Design with a minor in business. Before living with her, I would have completely stereotyped it as another Family and Consumer Science department major where they never study and still make straight As in classes that they should be ashamed of paying Baylor tuition for. Well let’s just say I was beyond wrong. Even as a biology/pre-health major, I think it is safe to say Chelsea puts in more hours than I do for my schoolwork, mostly consisting of all-nighter projects and slaving away for weeks for assignments that might be graded so subjectively. I’ve definitely gained a major respect for design majors and been convicted of my ignorant assumption that it’s a piece of cake. She has another year at Baylor, but I am beyond excited to watch how God continues to lead her in this plan for her life. Design and Jesus might not at first seem like they go hand in hand, but let’s not forget he was a carpenter.

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1. Describe the process of ultimately choosing to pursue design as your career. How did God lead you into this profession along the way and when did you know you were really walking in his calling on your life?

I started college as a Medical Humanities Pre-Physicians Assistant Major (joke?), thinking I was going to go to PA school and be a successful person in the medical field. God quickly humbled me by nearly failing my freshman biology class and finding zero interest in my pre-health classes. I went to career counseling mid-way through the semester, and after a number of tests and prayers I landed in the Interior Design department. I’ve always had a love and appreciation for all things creative but never viewed it as a profession. Honestly, I always thought interior designers were just “decorators” (false, they’re not. You don’t need a degree to decorate a space and I have yet to have a class that teaches me how to pick fabrics or where to place wall art). I knew with certainty that I was in the right place when I first heard my professor talk about public interest design/design for social justice: “human-centered and participatory design practice that places emphasis on ecological, economic, and social issues”. I knew I wanted my career to have a purpose and meaning and God shouted at me loud and clear after that lecture. I have also been on a number of mission trips that involved construction of some sort. Those was always my favorite parts of the trip because I love working with my hands, creating something, building, you name it. Through further reflections I felt confident that I was in the right place.

2. How do you hope to practically show the love of Jesus through your work and be a light to the people you interact with everyday? How do you see yourself serving God and others through your profession on a day-to-day basis?

I want to help those who do not have access to good design – those who don’t have solid roofs over their heads or a place to gather with community. I hope to use my skills in design and knowledge of sustainable building to improve the lives of others. Jesus acted for and with those who were in desperate places of need, and I hope to be there with those people. I want to forget about myself and partner with people who could use a space or a building. My hope is that on a daily basis I live in such a way that places others before me. No matter where I am – working in a firm, overseas, or in a classroom – I pray that I can be someone who takes genuine interest in others and seeks to show love through small acts of kindness or simple conversation.

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3. What opportunities, big or small, do you hope to have to partner with God and make an impact for his kingdom that you wouldn’t have otherwise if you weren’t doing what you are?

I hope to have the opportunity to travel to places where there is a design-related need and help meet that. Had I not been pursuing interior design I would not know what social impact/justice design was, or that there were ways to tangibly help communities with design. I hope to meet people from all different backgrounds and learn what it is that shapes their communities. I hope to hear peoples’ stories and let those stories drive the way a space is constructed.

4. What do you love most about your current season of life and what are you most excited about when thinking about your future?

I love the thought that God has something ahead of me that I most likely can’t fathom right now. That may cause anxiety for most people, but it’s exciting to me. I love that I am in a place where I can learn and absorb tons of information that I hope will serve as an aid in the long run. I feel as though there are so many opportunities right now ahead of me, and I am excited to see what those are over the next year and a half. Maybe grad school?!

5. How do you think you’ll stay enthusiastic/passionate and find the motivation to continue to work diligently for his glory?

I think it will take continual reminder of why I am doing what I am. It will take prayer and encouragement from my community to keep going when life seems to hit a wall or feel impossible. I don’t doubt there will be times when it is less exciting, but I hope to be the type of person who continues on despite my circumstances.

6. What advice would you give to college freshman on discovering and pursuing what God has for them in terms of their major, future career, etc?

Do not let money dictate what career/major you decide to pursue. You may be great at something, but if it doesn’t bring you life, or if your potential career doesn’t excite you, choose something else. God takes our passions and uses them in extravagant ways. When we are pursuing something we love, something that makes us come alive, something that brings us joy, that is when God can do his extravagant work. You have to trust Him.

“Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive and go do it. Because the world needs people who have come alive.” –Howard Thurman

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Chelsea never fails to ignite something in others’ hearts when she talks about her passion. She’s a listener, a dreamer, a laugher, a beauty, and a woman after God’s own heart.

P.S. – Fun fact: last semester she interned with Magnolia here in Wacotown (a.k.a. THE HGTV Fixer Upper’s own Chip and Joanna Gaines). So naturally she loves goats just like the ones at “The Farmhouse.”

Someone hire this girl. Also, she’s single. 😉

Thanks Chels and part three will be coming at you soon!

The Monday Mission Project, Part 1: Megan and Stanley

This post will serve as the kickoff to my series I’m doing as a creative project for my New Testament Christology class. The assignment is to come up with an engaging topic and work it into a unique presentation. This can be literally anything that relates to Christology or things we’ve discussed in lectures or readings throughout the semester (a.k.a. the study of all things Jesus, i.e. – basically anything that can be routed back to having to do with our own ideas of Christology).

The Monday Mission Project, as I’m calling it, will be a series of four or five posts featuring people in my life that don’t necessarily work in ministry or missions, but are still clearly using their career and what God has called them to as an avenue to show Jesus to those they encounter everyday. These weekday world-changers serve God in the big and small and are working to help advance the kingdom in the secular workplace on a regular basis. The name for the project represents how I hope to view my career in dentistry one day: that is, that even on the Monday-est of Mondays, I want to enthusiastically walk out in God’s plan for my life and realize the impact I can have through my profession and the specific gifts and passions God has given me. Your workplace might not be the jungles of third world countries or the pulpit of the local church, but it can still just as easily be your every day mission field. I hope that through this series we would all learn to look at our careers (current and, for my fellow college students, future) as just that: the Monday mission.

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The first people I’m featuring are none other than my own big sis and brother in law. Megan and Stanley have been married for six years, have an almost-two-year old named Elijah (my favorite ginger nephew), and have another little boy on the way. They live in Tyler, TX where Stanley works as an engineer at a heating and cooling company and Megan works part-time as a speech and language pathologist while still getting to spend the majority of her time at home with Elijah. They also have worked with their small local Vineyard church’s youth group as the primary youth ministers and Megan also serves on the worship team every Sunday. Read on to see how their lives are an incredible example of this kind of kingdom-minded living and how they are embracing God’s plan for their story each step of the way.ireland

1. Describe the process of ultimately choosing to pursue engineering and speech pathology for your careers. How did God lead you into these professions along the way and when did you know you were really walking in his calling on your life?

stanleyS: I know with me and engineering, it started in high school. It was really just a desire and an enjoyment of solving problems. It started with geometry – it was just fun. When I got to looking at career choices and college majors, engineering was the only thing that made sense to me. Mechanical engineering was the one I wanted because it’s a broad degree, and you can apply it a little more narrowly as you got into a career. I knew it was God’s calling over me because, again, it was just a natural fit. It was something that just worked. Something that I enjoyed, something that came easily at times, and something where I enjoyed the work of it which is, I think, a testament to God’s will in your life. If you can enjoy the work of it, I think that’s aligning very much with what God’s called you to.

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M: I initially went into my college career undecided. I had a few ideas, and I ended up doing some formal testing through Baylor’s career counseling department. I took all these tests that are supposed to give you a list of top match careers for you, and speech pathology was my number one. I had actually met a girl on my hall who was already majoring in that, and she invited me to come observe some of the therapy sessions at Baylor’s clinic one day with her to see what it really was all about. We watched a session with a boy who was about three years old, Autistic, and had a language delay. They were doing a lot of fun, engaging therapy getting him to communicate, and it just felt really exciting that I could do something to practically help someone have an improved quality of life. I learned more about the career and the incredible variety of settings from hospitals, schools, rehab clinics, etc., and the possibilities were endless for how I could specialize further down the road. I dove in head first my sophomore year, and the more I had some hands on opportunities –  specifically in grad school and my clinical practicum where I got to work more with adults – I felt like I was being called to go the medical route and work with adults who had lost some ability to function and communicate effectively. I decided to do a hospital externship which led me to where I am now, working with adults who have had neurogenic disorders. I’m able to help them restore critical functions such as swallowing, speech, language, or cognition. Working in a hospital every day really opened my eyes to how much we take for granted in our basic, every day living and I realized that what I do on a day to day basis really does impact people’s lives in simple but big ways.

2. How do you practically show the love of Jesus through your work and be a light to the people you interact with everyday? How do you see yourself serving God and others through your profession on a day-to-day basis?

S: One of the things that God has laid on my heart is to fund the mission field. I know God’s called me not to be a full time minister or missionary, but to use my career and degree to help fund those efforts for the people who are called to missions. He’s called me to be very generous with that which he’s given me through my career to do that, so that his work can be made whole on the earth. Another specific event at work recently was when a lady I sit next to at work was visibly upset, so I asked her what was going on. She said she really didn’t want to talk about it, but came back a few minutes later and told me her husband had recently told her he wanted a divorce. I knew she was a believer, so I knew it was a fair question to ask if we could pray or what can I do to help, so I prayed over her at the time. Then when I was driving home and continued to pray for her family, I felt like the Lord gave me a vision of three or four of us at work all sitting around a picnic table just praying together. The next day I basically told her here’s what I want to do and is that OK if we did that, and she said of course. It’s crucial to not put up boundaries at work to say,”Well, this probably isn’t appropriate.” When we have relationships where we know things will be received well we can walk into what God has in obedience. There are five or six of us that have already met to pray as a group and we’ll be meeting again this week simply to pray. It’s neat that God’s guided me into that and that it’s something as simple as coming together and centering ourselves around prayer.

M: Especially when I started out working in a hospital and was around very critically ill patients who might have bleak prognoses for their recovery, I really saw people at their worst. In their place of fear and the unknown, I can be a light and comfort to them. I can be very real and human with them, and sometimes maybe it’s okay to not be so professional or clinically minded. I can look at them as a person and reassure them that I get it. For example, “My grandfather went through this” or, “My friend just went through this.” I really just take a minute and consult them or comfort them without having to be overtly spiritual about it. It doesn’t have to be me asking to pray for every patient, although I’ve had several that have asked if I would pray for them. Some times the little things like that reassuring hand squeeze, a few extra encouraging words, or taking the time to counsel them through some terrible news from the doctor can really make a difference. I would just tell them that’s what Jesus would do – he’s going to meet the practical needs first and the spiritual needs second. Another instance is doing menial tasks that don’t feel like my job. I have a master’s degree, so naturally I don’t think that I should have to put their dentures in or clean them up after they go to the bathroom, but those basic tasks where I can be a servant to help someone else who might be having a bad or overworked day are huge opportunities to be the hands and feet of Jesus in a small way. Just having a kind demeanor in that very high stress environment where people are on edge and quick to snap, knowing that I could be that gentle encouraging person to make their day a little smoother is enough. We should never think we’re too good or that we’re above others we work with. I think it’s important to realize that nothing has to be too below us for us to be willing to step up and do it.

3. What opportunities, big or small, has your career given you to partner with God and make an impact for his kingdom that you wouldn’t have had otherwise if you weren’t doing what you are.

M: While I was at Baylor I had the opportunity to travel to Honduras with a group that was actually mostly deaf education students, but it was also open to speech pathology majors. Getting to experience another culture and interact with those people who had significant communication barriers was really eye-opening. I loved the chance to work with the kids and teach them about the bible and Jesus but also to give them something practical through teaching them a language and giving them a functional way to interact with their family friends. This was a really neat experience, and I wouldn’t have had that had I gone a different route with my major or career choice.

S: One of the biggest things is the ability to give to missionaries. We’ve done this a few times where we’ve been able to contribute to somebody’s long term missions or help them get a place in Brazil or Mexico for six months. To me that’s the biggest advantage of being able to work in the field I’m working is that it gives us the ability to help fund those who are walking in God’s calling and really just reach the poor and needy and those who are in desperate need of Christ.

4. What do you love most about your career or even your current season of life?

M: Right now specifically, I am loving the flexibility of my career and that it allows me to spend a lot of time at home with Elijah. I love that I get to be the primary person pouring into him spiritually and emotionally. I get to be his mom and his main teacher right now. I get to be the one reading books, doing nap time and meal time, or reading bible stories to him and hearing him say “Amen.” I don’t feel deprived of these early formative years which a lot of moms don’t get to be as directly involved in, and it is a luxury for a lot of women to get to stay home. It’s also a choice, and there’s nothing right or wrong and everyone does what they need to do for their family. I also get to be the one that disciplines him. I like being able to meet up with a girlfriend and get coffee or meet someone and their kid at the zoo in the middle of the week. There’s all this stuff I couldn’t wait to do while I was working that I get to do now. I love getting to experience the community of young and older moms, and that’s so important for your emotional health to talk about how hard it is but how grateful we all are at the same time. It’s a hard job, a lot of people will say it’s the hardest job, but I also think it’s the most rewarding.

S: Similar to what Megan was saying with the flexibility. We’re able to work with our youth group every Wednesday night, and I have been for the past eight years. I’m able to have weekends free for youth events at the house or ministering at the church on Sunday mornings. I love my set schedule of work, the stability, and knowing what to expect. It’s been huge to in order to do what God’s called us to with the youth ministry. As far as my day to day engineering job, I think it goes back to my original love for problem solving. Even now as I’m studying for my licensure exam, just sitting down and seeing the problems and finding a solution. That’s just a blast.

5. How do you stay enthusiastic/passionate and find the motivation to continue to work diligently for his glory?

M: It’s hard. Some mornings you don’t feel like it. There are seasons and months that you aren’t really sure if that’s what you should be doing, you don’t know where it’s going, you do have doubts, and don’t know if you chose the right thing. I’ve definitely had those feelings before. At the peak of what I’ll call two or three years of really hard season at my first job, I wasn’t really sure why I was doing it. You do have days when you don’t know why, because you don’t feel appreciated or valued, but you have to think about doing everything as unto the Lord. Even when you feel ignored by people, God sees what I’m doing and sees my heart. For me when I go to a conference or do some continuing education, I have this renewed sense of loving my field and realizing I need to stay current and engaged. When I got back out there working after a year at home, it really reignited my passion because it made me think on my toes and be creative about how I’m going to do a certain therapy.

S: Part of my personality is that I’m a very duty oriented person. I know that what I’m doing is providing for my home and my family. Yeah, sometimes I don’t feel like getting up at six and commuting an hour to work, and it is difficult some days. I just know it’s something God’s called me to as a husband and father. When I walk in that there’s joy in that. Sometimes it’s trudging through muck and mire, but there’s joy in doing what God has called me to do. I have to remind myself that this is the place that God has put me and my heart. My job is providing for my family in this God-given role, so I find a great deal of joy in fulfilling that role even though sometimes it can be mundane or frustrating. I’m ultimately excited to be fulfilling his plan for my life.

6. What advice would you give to college students who are wondering how they can serve God and be the hands and feet of Jesus through their careers even if it’s not directly in ministry, missions, the church, etc.?

S: The Holy Spirit has no bounds. We can’t box in God. It’s important to keep that in mind, especially in the workplace. Always respond to what the Holy Spirit’s prompting you to. There’s never going to be a situation when the Holy Spirit can’t come in and make room for God’s glory. Another thing I’ve learned is that relationships are key. I can’t necessarily minister to a youth just by preaching the truth of the gospel, I mean, absolutely that happens. When I’ve developed a one on one relationship with someone, and then I bring the gospel into that, the drastic difference in that is incredible. It’s really great to be able to say “We know each other, I love you, this is the gospel.” Never be afraid of developing those relationships in the workplace. Also, there’s no one thing you’re going to be called to do in life. God’s will is exactly where you are, and really that’s the important thing to understand. Don’t feel like you’re going to miss it.

M: I’m not literally witnessing to people every day and preaching the gospel to every patient I have, but I’m going to be real with them and a light in their darkness. I think that’s going to open a door for their heart to be softened. You can do that anywhere. And don’t live in the fear of getting in trouble of separation of work and faith or things like that. You don’t have to always worry about getting in trouble dealing with protocols, business, this isn’t done…I mean you do have to walk on eggshells in the real world workplace (S: Yeah, those are lies from the pit of hell), but just using discernment and know when it’s definitely OK to cross some of those “boundaries.”

A big thanks to Megan and Stanley, and be on the lookout for part two coming soon. IMG_3903